State of Metropolitan Housing Reports

MAY 2021

2020-2021 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The 2020-2021 State of Metropolitan Housing report details how COVID-19 has exacerbated housing insecurity and long standing racial and ethnic disparities in our community. Despite the various eviction moratoria, we continue to see families struggle to stay safe after losing their housing. Sometimes these families are forced into congregate living environments such as emergency shelters. Other times, they turn to families and friends, doubling or tripling up in overcrowded living situations, increasing their potential exposure to COVID-19. Now, new research finds that policies that limit evictions reduce COVID-19 infections by 3.8% and reduce deaths by 11%. Had such policies been in place consistently across the country since early March 2020, COVID-19 infections would have been reduced by 14.2% and deaths by 40.7%. In an effort to keep people safely housed during the ongoing pandemic-related economic downturn, we are seeing unprecedented funding come into the city. It will be critical that the community think strategically about how to use the wide range of new and existing federal funding sources to prevent increases in homelessness, increase housing stability, and meet public health goals. Reducing ongoing racial and ethnic disparities in economic, social, and health outcomes requires that this strategy be firmly rooted in a racial justice and equity framework.

2019

2019 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

Our analysis this year documents the housing, racial and ethnic, and demographic changes from 2000 to 2017 in Louisville/Jefferson County to tell the story of the development and maintenance of wealth and housing gaps that will persist unless policy changes are implemented at the local, state, and federal level. We also provide a critical summary of several new and affordable housing and community development initiatives. These initiatives are making some important positive changes but are not fully equipped to address the affordable housing gaps let alone any racial wealth gaps. Our findings show that in Louisville/Jefferson County, between 2000 and 2017, Black/African American homeownership rates declined, Black/African American homeowners experienced disproportionate losses in home values, Black/African American household incomes continue to remain far below the median of income of Louisville/Jefferson County, and Black/African American households earn a disproportionate share of Louisville/Jefferson County's 'income pie'. All of these factors unveil the scale of the racial wealth gap and the obstacles Black/African American households face in building and maintaining wealth.

2018

2018 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

This report looks at the surprisingly high rate of evictions of renters in Louisville. Key findings show that while eviction rates are declining overall since 2000, census tracts in the western and southeastern parts of Jefferson County have eviction rates that are higher than other areas of Louisville. The report also looks at foreclosures because the rate of foreclosures is still above what it was before the crisis (2005). The analysis in the report shows that areas in the western part of Jefferson County are still struggling with higher foreclosure sales than other parts of Louisville. These places also had the largest shares of foreclosure filings in 2007 and 2005, according to MHC's 2008 Louisville Foreclosure Crisis report, highlighting the enduring nature of the spatial concentration of foreclosure in high poverty and majority non-white communities. The report also looks at how Louisville and the whole Metropolitan Statistical Area is changing and whether we have planned and acted to ensure that low wage workers and those on fixed income are not in peril of being forced along to ever diminishing areas of affordability. There are new and significant investments in areas of western Louisville that may bring much needed and welcome prosperity. The neighborhood typology developed in the reports highlights areas facing the highest risk for involuntary displacement. As real estate and commercial enterprises rise in these areas, where will those who have been limited to the areas of lowest rents and housing costs be able to live? How can we have a bright economic future if our residents, particularly children trying to learn, workers trying to be reliable and the elderly trying to maintain health are experiencing instability in housing?

2017

2017 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The report examines the nine housing indicators that MHC tracks to assess annual progress on fair housing and affordable housing opportunities in the 13-county Louisville Metropolitan Area, which includes five counties in southern Indiana. The focus topic of the 2017 Metropolitan Housing Report is: "The State of Affordable Rental in the Louisville Region." More people in the region are renting. Between 2010-2015, the percentage of rented occupied units increased by 9.3%. Additionally, an increasing number of higher income people are renting. Since 2006, the percentage of renters that are upper income increased by 4.2& and now stands at 16.1%. Renters in the region are increasingly rent-burdened, especially low-income renters. Very low-income households are the most cost-burdened across the MSA> Louisville's eviction rate, 5.3%, is the seventh highest of the largest fifty Metropolitan Statistical Areas. There is a gap in available affordable rental units of about 24,000, across the MSA, for households earning less than $20,000. Our renter market continues to be racially segregated across the MSA. While renter households are more likely to be white than black or people of color, a higher proportion of black or African-Americans households rent. However, there are also counties in the region in which there are no black or African-American households who rent.

2016

2016 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The report examines nine housing indicators that MHC tracks to assess annual progress on fair housing and affordable housing opportunities in the 13-county Louisville Metropolitan Area, which includes five counties and southern Indiana. The focus topic of the 2016 State of Metropolitan Housing Report is: Housing for People Living with Disabilities and our Aging Population". Our population is aging. We have known for decades that as the "Baby Boomer" generation ages, that group would contribute to an enormous increase in the numbers and proportion of those who are 65 years and older – a figure that currently stands at about 14 percent in the United States. Seniors' ability to find affordable housing across the U.S. is an increasing challenge. The number of those paying more than half of their household income on increased housing increased by 34 percent from 2005 to 2014 (Make Room 2016). Providing services to and benefiting from what this age group has to offer are issues all communities are beginning to address in some fashion. Furthermore, as we age, the potential for experiencing long-term disability increases. Attention to the intersection of age and disability is therefore crucial to examining access to fair, safe, and affordable housing.

2015

2015 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The report examines nine housing indicators that MHC tracks to assess annual progress on fair housing and affordable housing opportunities in the 13-county Louisville Metropolitan Area, which includes five counties in southern Indiana. The focus topic is two key events in 2015 that will shape how communities address fair housing issues at local, regional, and state levels. These are the United States Supreme Court decision Texas Department Of Housing And Community Affairs et al. V. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. et al. Certiorari To The United States Court Of Appears For The Fifth Circuit No. 13-1371, argued January 21, 2015 – decided June 25th, 2015, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) Final Rule on Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH). The focus topic of the 2015 State of Metropolitan Housing Report lays out key local implications of these two federal actions and provides an update on the legal landscape of the Louisville Metro Fair Housing. These two actions have national repercussions by empowering fair housing.

2014

2014 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The report examines nine housing indicators that MHC tracks to assess annual progress on fair housing and affordable housing opportunities in the 13-county Louisville Metropolitan Area, which includes five counties in southern Indiana. The 2014 State of Metropolitan Housing Report also revisits focus topics and recommendations made by Metropolitan Housing Coalition over the past eight years. The 2014 report re-examines five key policy areas: planning and zoning, transportation, utilities, environmental quality, and vacant properties. These are policy issues that intersect to impact the distribution of fair, affordable, and safe housing across our area. By highlighting examples of progress and on-going opportunities for improvement, we bring attention to the need for understanding how decisions in one sphere impact outcomes in others.

2013

2013 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The Louisville area housing market has changed dramatically since the national collapse of the housing market in 2008. These changes have not only affected the composition of the housing market in Louisville but also the demographics of those who rent and own. Both locally and nationally, the percentage of households renting has increased and rental vacancy rates have decreased. Both of these factors have lead to increased rental prices which in turn affect rental affordability.

2012

2012 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

Through its nine measures of fair and affordable housing, the 2012 State of Metropolitan Housing Report clearly demonstrates Metropolitan Louisville's growing need for safe, fair, and affordable housing. For the first time, the SMHR includes data on the number of children experiencing homelessness in the MSA's public school systems; before MHC reported only on Jefferson County Public Schools. The focus topic of the 2012 report is vacant properties and their impact on the community as well as current efforts and best practices that address this issue. The report also drills down into the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, a federal program designed to address the issue of vacant properties, and how it was used in Louisville. The report was researched and written by a team from the University of Louisville Center for Environmental Policy and Management (CEPM) – John Vick, M.S., Carol Norton, AIPC Allison Smith, Ph.D., and Lauren Heberle, Ph.D. The report was made possible by the generous support of: Louisville Metro Department of Community Services and Revitalization; Louisville Metro Council Neighborhood Development Fund – with thanks to Metro Council members Mariana Butlet, Attica Woodson Scott, Tina Ward Pugh, Glen Stuckel, Start Benson, Robin Engel, Jon Ackerson, Cheri Bryant Hamilton, Tom Owen, David Yates, Kelly Downard, David Tandy, and Mary Woolridge; PNC Bank; Fifth Third Bank; and the Gannett Foundation.

2011

2011 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The 2011 report examines nine indicators of fair and affordable housing progress in the 13-county Louisville Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and this year brings in new 2010 census data. In addition to the nine measures, the report also looks at environmental justice issues of soil, water, and air quality as well as approaches to providing fair and affordable housing that uses less energy. "This year the State of Metropolitan Housing Report specifies links between safe and affordable housing and environmental harms and benefits. We see a natural coalition between those who advocate for affordable housing and those who advocate for environmental justice and environmental protection", states Dr. Lauren C. Heberle, Director, Center for Environmental Policy and Management. The 2011 State of Metropolitan Housing Report is made possible by the generous support of Louisville Metro Government, MHC board member Janet Dakan, PNC and the Gannett Foundation.

2010

2010 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

In addition to its nine measures of affordable housing in the Louisville Metropolitan Statistical Area, the 2010 State of Metropolitan Housing Report provides a housing policy roadmap for our community. It examines the housing policies and strategies that can shape housing choices for individuals and families in Louisville. The report provides an outline for what issues local and state housing policies should address, what policies and strategies have been successful in other cities, the most effective ways to implement these policies, and strategies to provide fair and affordable housing for all members of the Louisville community.

2009

2009 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

On our 20th anniversary, MHC is releasing our seventh State of Metropolitan Housing Report, an ongoing report card od the fair and affordable housing challenges and successes in the Louisville Metropolitan Statistical Area. Instead of choosing a specific focus topic, we have expanded measure to examine the way each are connected to create an overall picture of housing in our region.

2008

2008 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The 2008 State of Metropolitan Housing Report is a report card of the affordable housing challenges and successes in the Louisville metropolitan region. This year's report focuses on utilities cost and energy efficiency as an integral component of housing affordability.

2007

2007 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

In 2007, the SMHR focus topic is transportation in our region — How is it financed? What is the planning process? Who makes the decisions? How can we have our voices heard? When we started, we found this area to be one of seemingly deliberate obfuscation which denied individuals meaningful input in the planning process. What we found is that the nominal decision makers are not being held accountable as they defer their responsibility. But we can take back control of the over $1 billion dollars spent on transportation! It starts with each of you requiring your elected officials – state and local – to be accountable. MHC also makes policy recommendations including a process that includes the public before all the decisions are made.

2006

2006 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

MHC's annual report card on affordable housing examines land development codes and their impact in the Louisville Metro region on affordable housing.

2005

2005 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

The 2005 SMHR focuses on the role of non-profit affordable housing developers in creating affordable housing and revitalizing neighborhoods, with government cooperation. MHC now staffs the Non-profit Housing Alliance and MHC's role in facilitating the creation of affordable housing is well underway. The report also includes new indicators in our measurement of our community's ability to provide fair and affordable housing throughout our region. We have included gender in our study of segregation, as women head 35% of all households.

2004

2004 State of Metropolitan Housing

In addition to its housing measures, the 2004 State of Metropolitan Housing Report highlights the riding rates of foreclosure in the Louisville metropolitan area.

2003

2003 State of Metropolitan Housing Report

MHC's first in-depth annual report that reports on 9 measures of housing in the Louisville Metropolitan Statistical Area. Published annually after 2003.

See More

Overview

MHC conducts and compiles research relevant to housing in the metropolitan region. Since 2003, we have published the annual State of Metropolitan Housing Report, which provides indicators on nine measures of affordable housing and has different focus issues annually. We also produce papers on specific housing issues.

Scroll through the report library to review titles and abstracts, or use the report search engine to locate the report you are seeking.

Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing

May 11th, 2020

2020 Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice in Louisville Metro, KY

At the request of Metro government, MHC prepared the 2020 Analysis of impediments to Fair Housing Choice for Louisville Metro, Kentucky (AI). It was adopted as a policy by Metro Government in May 2020 and submitted to HUD as part of the 5-year Consolidated Plan. The AI examines the state of housing choice for the protected classes (race, color, national origin, sex, familial status, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity) in Louisville Metro, KY. The AI not only looks at where people in protected classes live, but proposes actions steps to tear down barriers to fair housing.

April 2nd, 2015

2015 Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice in Louisville Metro, KY

At the request of Metro government, MHC prepared the 2015 Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice for Louisville Metro, KY (AI). It was adopted as policy by Metro Government and submitted to HUD as part of the 5-year Consolidated Plan. The AI examines the state of housing choice for the protected classes 9race, color, national origin, sex, familial status, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and gender identity) in Louisville Metro, KY. The AI not only looks at where people in protected classes live, but proposes action steps to tear down barriers to fair housing.

March 30th, 2010

2010 Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice in Louisville Metro, KY

At the request of Metro government, MHC prepared the 2010 Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice for Louisville Metro, Kentucky (AI). It was adopted as policy by Metro Government in March 2010 and submitted to HUD as part of a 5-year Consolidated Plan. The AI examines the state of housing choice for the protected classes (race, color, national origin, sex, familial status, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity) in Louisville Metro, KY. The AI not only looks at where people in protected classes live, but proposes action steps to tear down barriers to fair housing.

November 2nd, 2011

Analysis of Policies That Are Impediments to Full Expenditure of LIHEAP Funds in Areas with Metered Utilities

MHC advocates for three changes in policy at the state level which will allow low-income households in Jefferson County to fully benefit from energy assistance as intended by the federal Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). The three changes are to: extend the program cut-off date for metered areas that actually allow the delay between consumption and billing for the heating season; retain the $400 cap for households in metered areas; and allow any unspent funds from the heating season to be held by the jurisdiction until the cooling season and/or be used for energy efficient modifications to residences. MHC circulated information on our policy work and asked for organizations to sign onto this letter to the Commissioner of Kentucky Department of Community-Based Services, which administers the LIHEAP program and to the Kentucky Attorney General's office. Seven other organizations signed on with MHC and the letter was sent on November 2, 2011.

See More

Overview

Historical Reports

Unfair Housing in Louisville: A Legacy Project (Thematic Analysis)

The Unfair Housing in Louisville: A Legacy Project is an oral history project focused on documenting, understanding, and preserving the history of housing discrimination in Louisville. This is a collaboration of the Metropolitan Housing Coalition and the University of Louisville Oral History Center. Louisville journalist and historian Michael Jones is conducting interviews for the project.

July 21st, 2017

Helping You Manage Your Utility Costs 2017

Improving energy efficiency at your home with resources to assist with paying your utility bills.

December 17th, 2015

Searching for Safe, Fair, & Affordable Housing. Learning from Experiences. An Analysis of Housing Challenges in Louisville Metro

This report follows up on the 20-year action plan and enacts one of its first action steps by filling the knowledge gap about specific challenges and needs that a diverse range of local residents contend with in finding and keeping suitable housing. In addition, this report presents local residents' descriptions of what they appreciate in their current living situations, what they would change if they could, where they would live if affordable housing was available everywhere, and what, if any, instances of housing discrimination have they experienced. The answers to this set of questions provide insight to identifying steps our community can take to become a home for all, the parts of our city/county in which residents most want more affordable housing, how to set priorities that increase housing choice, and what our local priorities should be in enforcement of fair housing laws.

February 13th, 2014

Making Louisville Home for Us All: A 20-Year Action Plan for Fair Housing

The report examines the history of housing policies and practices in metropolitan Louisville, Kentucky, and recommends action steps that can reverse harmful effects from the past and more affirmatively further fair housing in the community over the next 20 years.

July 11th, 2013

How to Lower Utility Costs

A guide to Louisville programs for energy efficient improvements and resources to help pay a utility bill.

February 6th, 2013

State of Fair and Affordable Housing in Lexington-Fayette Urban County, Kentucky

A report of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission (LFUCHRC). The State of Fair and Affordable Housing Report for Lexington-Fayette Urban County, Kentucky examines local housing conditions in Lexington-Fayette Urban County with a particular focus on housing fairness, choice, and affordability. LFUCHRC released this much needed in-depth look at fair and housing as a tool for both public and private sectors. LFUCHR seeks to focus efforts to improve fair housing choices in Lexington and to strengthen the links between fair housing and affordable housing. Lexington, along with the rest of the state and country, has seen many demographic changes and gathered the information for easy access. Metropolitan Housing Coalition and the University of Louisville Center for Environmental Policy and Management did the research and writing of this report. The report was produced in partnership with the Lexington Fair Housing Council and was funded by a grant from United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

March 5th, 2012

Louisville Vacant Properties Campaign Presentation to Metro Council Ad Hoc Committee on Vacant Properties

On Monday, March 5, the Metro Council Ad-Hoc Committee on Vacant Properties held its meeting at the Shawnee Neighborhood Association offices on Amy Avenue. Nearly 60 people attended and heard presentations from MHC and the Network Center for Community Change (NC3). MHC's Cathy Hinko spoke about the work of the Louisville Vacant Property Campaign and policy options available to help our community better respond to our growing vacant property crisis.

March 21st, 2012

Louisville’s Foreclosure Recovery: Understanding and Responding to the Impact of Foreclosure Sales

Louisville's Foreclosure Recovery updates MHC's January 2008 report of Louisville's Foreclosure Crisis. The 2008 report examined and analyzed all 1,699 foreclosures filed in Jefferson County, KY from January 1 through June 30, 2007. This paper examines the status of those properties, using data from local government supplemented by site examination. The report assesses current trends in foreclosure in Louisville, the impact of foreclosure on vacancy rates, the tremendous loss in home value resulting from these 2007 foreclosures, and the subsequent increase in costs and loss in property tax revenue to Metro Louisville Government. The paper concludes with recommended actions that will guide a recovery from the tremendous losses of foreclosure in our city. Louisville's Foreclosure Recovery was produced in partnership with the Network Center for Community Change (NC3) and is sponsored by Louisville Metro Council and NC3.

December 31st, 2012

Neighborhood Stabilization Program in Louisville: An MHC Issue Brief

This issue brief describes the impact of the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) in Louisville, as administered by the Louisville Metro Department of Community Services and Revitalization. NSP is a federal program created by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 that worked to stabilize neighborhoods that have suffered from foreclosure and abandonment. In Louisville, NSP targeted 5 neighborhoods: Shawnee, Smoketown, Shelby Park, Portland, Newburg, and Park du Valle.

January 26th, 2011

State of Fair Housing In Louisville

More than forty years after the first Fair Housing laws were enacted, Louisville remains a segregated city. The State of Fair Housing in Louisville: Impediments and Improvements examines where people protected by Fair Housing laws live and explores the barriers that lie at the heart of true fair housing choice, many of which are inherited. The report offers action steps to remove barriers to fair housing choice so that it becomes a reality. MHC wishes to thank the sponsors of this report: Louisville Metro Government, through the Department of Housing and through a special grant from the Ninth District Councilwoman Tina Ward-Pugh, and Making Connections Network. MHC would also like to thank the Louisville Metro Human Relations Commission for including the release of the State of Fair Housing in Louisville in the 15th Annual Race and Relations Conference on January 25, 2011.

May 6th, 2011

Homeless – Not Helpless: Coordinating a Community Response to Homeless Students White Paper

Due to the significant rise in the number of students experiencing homelessness in Jefferson County Public Schools (10,555 students in 2009-10), three major systems – the Jefferson County Public Schools, the Kentucky Cabinet for Family and Health Services Department of Community-Based Services and the Jefferson County Family Court – convened a cross-training, held on September 17, 2010 on the effects of this exponential rise in the number and percentage of youth who are homeless and touched by these systems. The focus of the training was to learn about this growing problem and together approach solutions to serving these children. Conference attendees participated in small group breakout sessions to collaboratively brainstorm ideas that identify and address the gaps and barriers that exist within and between systems to meeting the best interest of children who are homeless. This White Paper summarizes and makes recommended action steps based on the ideas from the groups. These ideas were categorized into six areas: Training and Professional Development, New Resources, A Community-Wide Response, Ways to Improve Communication, Housing Ideas, and New Collaborations. The discussions initiated at the conference must continue and should be viewed as just the first small step in coordinating a better response to children's homelessness.

June 30th, 2009

Vacant Properties: A Tool to Turn Neighborhood Liabilities into Assets

No matter if you call Germantown, Fairdale or Shawnee home, every neighborhood in Louisville has been affected by vacant properties. This issue paper will teach you about this widespread problem and introduce solutions for change.

August 19th, 2009

Where Do You Live? Louisville’s Homeless Children and the Affordable Housing Crisis

During the 2008-2009 school year, 8,582, nearly 9%, of all the children in the JCPS system were homeless at some time in the year. As an estimated ten families face foreclosure each day in the Louisville area, MHC is releasing this much needed in-depth look at how children are being affected by the growing affordable housing crisis. With this rich data we will formulate policy based recommendations and actions you can take to help improve this crisis. Thanks to our sponsors Making Connections Louisville and PNC Bank. Without your support, this report would not be possible. Also, thank you to JCPS who worked with researchers Valerie Salley and Fran Ellers.

January 10th, 2008

Louisville’s Foreclosure Crisis – Powerpoint Presentation

Power Point Presentation on Foreclosure report findings.

January 10th, 2008

Louisville’s Foreclosure Crisis – Report Appendices

Appendices to the Foreclosure Report include: Foreclosure Data for the Annie E. Casey Neighborhoods; Foreclosures by State Senate District; Foreclosures by Investment Property by Neighborhood; Data Sources; Characteristics of Foreclosed Loans; 2007 Foreclosures by Month Compared to 2005; Foreclosures by Lender; Mortgage Lender with Adjustable Rates, Prepayment Penalties or Insurance & Tax Exclusions by Area; Utility Costs by Type, Age and Size of Home; Foreclosures by Zip Code; Foreclosures by Census Tract.

January 20th, 2008

Louisville’s Foreclosure Crisis

A study of loan elements and Property Valuation information for all foreclosures in Louisville Metro from January 1 to June 30th, 2007 and interviews with 26 individuals households in foreclosure.

March 5th, 2008

Housing Insecurity: Neighborhood Conversations on Health Care Costs

MHC's 2008 recommendations for changes in health care policy in Kentucky and the nation.

June 26th, 2007

The Dividing Line: Women & Housing Patterns in Louisville

In 2007, there were over 100,000 female headed households in Louisville Metro–over 35% of households! This paper studies where single mothers, women over 65 and single women without children live and examines household income as well as family compensation.

April 19th, 2006

Opening the Door: 40 Years of Open Housing

Just forty years ago, many Louisville residents opposed the basic notion that African American citizens have the right to rent or own a home anywhere in the city. Like many cities at the time, Louisville's laws overtly supported racial inequality. this issue paper, sponsored generously by US Bank, looks into our city's fair housing history. Thank you to US Bank for sponsoring this powerful issue paper.

March 1st, 2005

Out of Breath: Childhood Asthma, Poverty and Housing

This report examines the relationship between childhood asthma and concentration of poverty in our community.

March 1st, 2005

Out of Breath: Childhood Asthma, Poverty and Housing – Methodology and Data Sources

Additional information about the methodology and data sources used for Out of Breath: Childhood Asthma, Poverty and Housing.

June 20th, 2005

When Work Doesn’t Pay: The Challenges of Housing Our Essential Workforce

This report shows that there is a significant gap between what workers earn and the cost of safe, decent housing in the Louisville Metropolitan Statistical Area. To reduce this gap, there are two solutions – to increase wages and to create new sources and forms of housing subsidy to provide low-cost housing.

February 15th, 2004

Moving On: Student Mobility and Affordable Housing

This analysis, using Jefferson County Public Schools data, demonstrates the link between education and housing. Students who do not have stable homes suffer in their academic performance.

June 28th, 2004

CDBG: A Tool for Neighborhoods

This 2004 report will let you see how you can influence the use of the Metro Government's largest fund–the Community Development Block Grant. Primarily used to benefit low-income people and neighborhoods, this is a powerful source of funding for projects that will improve low-income neighborhoods and the people's lives that live in them.

Clarksdale HOPE VI: Community Supportive Services Program Evaluation Final Report: A Critical Analysis

The paper analyzes the 2011 Clarksdale HOPE VI: Community Supportive Services Program Evaluation Final Report (Clarksdale Report) by Dr. Ramona Stone and provides recommendations to Louisville Metro Housing Authority (LMHA) for criteria it should use to evaluate proposals to conduct independent program evaluation of the Sheppard Square HOPE VI Revitalization project. Using Michael Quinn Patton's "utilization-focused evaluation" model as a lens, the critical analysis determines the Clarksdale Report represents a lost opportunity for LMHA to gain useful information about the implementation and effects of its Clarksdale HOPE VI Revitalization CSS program that would enable it to tailor those services to better meet the needs of Sheppard Square residents who will shortly begin relocation from the site.

See More

Overview

Newsletters

September 2021

09 – September 2021

July/August 2021

07/08 – July/August 2021

June 2021

06 – June 2021

May 2021

05 – May 2021

March 2021

03 – March 2021

February 2021

02 – February 2021

January 2021

01 – January 2021

October 2020

10 – October 2020

August/September 2020

08 & 09 – August/September 2020

July 2020

07 – July 2020

April 2020

04 – April 2020

March 2020

03 – March 2020

February 2020

02 – February 2020

January 2020

01 – January 2020

January 2019

01 – January 2019

February 2019

02 – February 2019

March 2019

03 – March 2019

April 2019

4 – April 2019

May & June 2019

05 & 06 – May/June 2019

July 2019

07 – July 2019

August 2019

08 – August 2019

September 2019

09 – September 2019

October 2019

10 – October 2019

November/December 2019

11 & 12 – November/December 2019

January 2018

01 – January 2018

February 2018

02 – February 2018

March 2018

03 – March 2018

April 2018

04 – April 2018

May 2018

05 – May 2018

August 2018

08 – August 2018

September 2018

09 – September 2018

October 2018

10 – October 2018

November 2018

11 – November 2018

December 2018

12 – December 2018

January 2017

01 – January 2017

February 2017

02 – February 2017

March 2017

03 – March 2017

April 2017

04 – April 2017

May/June 2017

05 – May/June 2017

July 2017

06 – July 2017

August 2017

07 – August 2017

September 2017

08 – September 2017

October 2017

09 – October 2017

November/December 2017

10 – November/December 2017

January 2016

01 – January 2016

February 2016

02 – February 2016

March 2016

03 – March 2016

April 2016

04 – April 2016

May 2016

05 – May 2016

June/July 2016

06 – June/July 2016

August 2016

07 – August 2016

September 2016

08 – September 2016

October 2016

09 – October 2016

November/December 2016

10 – November/December 2016

January 2015

01 – January 2015

February 2015

02 – February 2015

March 2015

03 – March 2015

April 2015

04 – April 2015

May/June 2015

05 – May/June 2015

August 2015

06 – August 2015

September 2015

07 – September 2015

October 2015

08 – October 2015

November/December 2015

09 – November/December 2015

January 2014

01 – January 2014

February 2014

02 – February 2014

March 2014

03 – March 2014

April 2014

04 – April 2014

May 2014

05 – May 2014

June 2014

06 – June 2014

August 2014

07 – August 2014

September 2014

08 – September 2014

October 2014

09 – October 2014

November/December 2014

10 – November/December 2014

January 2013

01 – January 2013

February 2013

02 – February 2013

March 2013

03 – March 2013

April 2013

04 – April 2013

May 2013

05 – May 2013

June 2013

06 – June 2013

August 2013

07 – August 2013

September 13

08 – September 2013

October 2013

09 – October 2013

November/December 2013

10 – November/December 2013

January 2012

January 2012

February 2012

February 2012

March 2012

March 2012

April 2012

April 2012

May 2012

May 2012

June 2012

June 2012

July/August 2012

July/August 2012

September 2012

September 2012

October 2012

October 2012

November 2012

November 2012

December 2012

December 2012

January 2011

January 2011

February 2011

February 2011

March 2011

March 2011

April 2011

April 2011

May 2011

May 2011

June 2011

June 2011

August 2011

August 2011

September 2011

September 2011

October 2011

October 2011

November 2011

November 2011

December 2011

December 2011

January 2010

January 2010

February 2010

February 2010

March 2010

March 2010

April 2010

April 2010

May 2010

May 2010

June-July 2010

June-July 2010

August 2010

August 2010

September 2010

September 2010

October 2010

October 2010

November 2010

November 2010

December 2010

December 2010

January 2009

January 2009

February 2009

February 2009

March 2009

March 2009

April 2009

April 2009

May 2009

May 2009

June-July 2009

June-July 2009

August 2009

August 2009

September 2009

September 2009

October 2009

October 2009

November/December 2009

November/December 2009

January 2008

January 2008

February 2008

February 2008

March 2008

March 2008

April 2008

April 2008

May 2008

May 2008

June 2008

June 2008

July-August 2008

July-August 2008

September 2008

September 2008

October 2008

October 2008

November/December 2008

November/December 2008

January 2007

January 2007

February 2007

February 2007

March 2007

March 2007

April 2007

April 2007

May 2007

May 2007

June 2007

June 2007

July-August 2007

July-August 2007

September 2007

September 2007

October 2007

October 2007

November/December 2007

November/December 2007

January 2006

January 2006

February 2006

February 2006

March 2006

March 2006

April 2006

April 2006

May 2006

May 2006

July-August 2006

July-August 2006

September 2006

September 2006

November/December 2006

November/December 2006

January 2005

January 2005

February 2005

February 2005

March 2005

March 2005

April 2005

April 2005

May 2005

May 2005

June 2005

June 2005

July-August 2005

July-August 2005

September 2005

September 2005

October 2005

October 2005

November/December 2005

November/December 2005

April 2004

April 2004

May 2004

May 2004

June 2004

June 2004

July-August 2004

July-August 2004

September 2004

September 2004

October 2004

October 2004

November/December 2004

November/December 2004
See More

Overview

Recent MHC newsletters can be downloaded below. To review newsletters dating back to April 2004, go to the Newsletter Archive.

Fair Housing PSAs

Overview

Through a grant from HUD (administered by the Louisville Metro Human Relations Commission), MHC worked with local high school students and Patrick Fitzgerald of Beargrass Media to make Fair Housing Public Service announcements.

Renter Center

Episode 1: What to Know Before Renting

View More

Episode 2: Can You Afford to Rent This Unit?

View More

Episode 3: Disability Rights

View More

Episode 4: Rent Assistance

View More
See More

Overview

With grant funding from the Louisville Bar Foundation and the Louisville Affordable Housing Trust Fund (LAHTF), the Metropolitan Housing Coalition (MHC) is partnering with the Louisville Urban League, Legal Aid Society Louisville, and the Lexington Fair Housing Council to create Renter Center, a rental readiness program designed to educate renters about their rights and responsibilities and how to have a successful tenure as a renter.

 

Renter Center will include a series of short videos on a variety of important renting topics and access to renter resources, such as an affordability calculator. The first two videos focus on, “What to know before renting” and “Can you afford to rent this unit?”. Stay tuned as MHC continues develop Renter Center and to produce videos with Beargrass Media and host educational forums across Louisville.

Policy Library

Louisville Metro Government Documents

As a “participating jurisdiction” receiving Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME, Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) and Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) funds directly from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Louisville Metro is required to submit a 5-year Consolidated Plan for use of those funds, annual Action Plans for those funds, and annual reports on how those funds are used. The Department of Community Services & Revitalization is responsible for the administration of those funds.

 

Downloads

See More

Overview

MHC maintains a library of important policy documents created by local governmental and quasi-governmental agencies for public review and use.